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Cooking lobster is an art, and if you do not get the timing just right, you might be in for a tough or chewy lobster. Never overcook your lobster. This makes the meat tough and stringy.

Fill a large pot 2/3 full of water; add 1-2 tbsp salt per gallon. (If sea water is available, skip the salt). Bring water to a rolling boil, add lobsters, and bring back to a boil.

Lobster weight boiling time (start timing when the water comes back to a boil)
1 1/4 lb lobster.....6-7 minutes
1 1/2 lb lobster.....7-9 minutes
2 lb lobster.......10-12 minutes
3 lb lobster.......12-13 minutes
5-6 lb lobster.....18-20 minutes
*Use the weight of individual lobsters, not the total weight of all lobsters being cooked.

Lobsters may still be undercooked even if the shell turns entirely red. When properly cooked, lobster meat is a creamy white color all the way through with no translucent areas. To double check if a lobster is done, give a tug on its antenna. If it detaches, the lobster is done.
Cooking lobster is an art, and if you do not get the timing just right, you might be in for a tough or chewy lobster. Never overcook your lobster. This makes the meat tough and stringy.

Fill a large pot with 2-3 inches of water. Bring to a rolling boil, add the bosters, cover, and steam. Steam a lobster for 8 minutes per pound, for the first pound. Add 3 minutes per pound for each additional pound after the first pound. Regulate the heat if the froth starts to bubble over.

Keep the lid on tight to keep in the steam. We suggest using a steamer rack or an upside down colander inside the pot to avoid charring on the bottom of the pot.

Lobster weight steaming time(start timing when the water comes back to a boil)
1 1/4 lb lobster.....7-8 minutes
1 1/2 lb lobster....8-10 minutes
2 lb lobster.......11-12 minutes
3 lb lobster.......12-14 minutes
5 lb lobster.......20-22 minutes
*Use the weight of individual lobsters, not the total weight of all lobsters being cooked.

Lobsters may still be undercooked even if the shell turns entirely red. When properly cooked, lobster meat is a creamy white color all the way through with no translucent areas. To double check if a lobster is done, give a tug on its antenna. If it detaches, the lobster is done.
Soak the steamers in sea water or salty water. (Dissolve a tablespoon of salt in every quart of water). If you have the time, place the steamers in a bucket and cover with several inches of sea water or salty water, and let sit several hours in a cool place overnight.

After a while, you'll notice that each clam has a foot that will start to extend out of the shell. They will discharge any sand or dirt while they are sitting in the water, so the water may become murky. You can change the water if you want.

If you don't have time to let the clams soak for hours, just put several of them at a time in a large bowl, cover with water, and gently swirl the water around with your fingers for 30-45 seconds.

When ready to cook, put about an inch of water in the bottom of a tall, large pot. You can also use beer. Place a steamer rack at the bottom of the pot. Carefully place the clams on the steamer rack. The clam shells are thin and can easily break, so be gentle as you put them in the pot.

Cover the pot. Bring the water to a boil. Let the clams cook in the steam from the boiling water for about 5-10 minutes, until the steamer clam shells are wide open, then remove the pot from the heat. Any steamers that didn't open should be thrown out. The pot might foam up and boil over while cooking, so keep an eye on it while cooking.

Let the clams cool for a couple minutes. Carefully remove the cooked clams from the pot, placing them in a serving bowl. Do not discard the clam broth left in the pot. Instead pour a bit into bowls for serving.

Melt 1/2 cup of butter in a small bowls for dipping. To eat, open the shell and remove the cooked clam. Use your fingers to pull off the skin covering the siphon of the clam.

Scrub the outside of the shells with a scrub brush under cold, running water to remove all dirt. Discard any open or cracked shells, since this is a sign of a dead or compromised oyster. Do not wash your oysters far in advance of eating them. Washing your oysters hours before you plan on steaming them may kill them.

Pour 2 inches of water into a pot. Add a half glass of beer or a glass of wine to the water for a bit of flavor and aroma. Place a metal steamer tray or colander into the pot to hold the oysters. Arrange the oysters on the tray or colander. Bring steaming liquid to a boil and then cover the pot with a lid.

Steam the oysters for approximately 5 minutes. Turn the burner to medium-high and allow the oysters to steam for 5-10 minutes. 5 minutes for a medium-cooked oyster, 10 for a well-done oyster. At this point, most of the oysters should have opened. Discard any oysters that did not open.

Heat a deep fryer to 375 fahrenheit.

Chuck your oysters. Cover the front of the oyster with a cloth and carefully slide an oyster knife into the hinge at the back of the oyster. Twist the knife with your wrist to break the hinge. Then slide the knife around the top of the shell, prying the top shell off when loose enough. Slide the knife under the bottom of the oyster flesh to remove the oyster foot from the bottom shell.

Coat the oysters for frying: combine 1/2 cup flour, 1 tsp salt, and 1/2 tsp ground black pepper. Lightly beat together 2 eggs in a separate bowl. Drain 12 ounces of shucked oysters and dredge them in the egg mixture. Coat them in the dry mixture. Coat evenly and thickly but remove excess flour.

Place the oysters, 5-6 at a time, in the deep fryer. Allow them to cook for 2 minutes until they are golden brown.

Remove from fryer; let stand for a minute. Serve hot and enjoy!